Philadelphia to keep Solari split-flap boards

Trieste - The US contribute to preserving the history of Italian design. Philadelphia said 'no' to Amtrack's decision to replace the traditional split-flap display at 30th Street Station

Philadelphia to keep Solari split-flap boards
 Filadelfia slip-flat display a 30th Street Station (afp)

Trieste - The US contribute to preserving the history of Italian design. Philadelphia said 'no' to Amtrack's decision to replace the traditional split-flap display at 30th Street Station, listing tracks and times for trains arriving in and departing from Philadelphia. The old analogical displays, commonly known as a Solari board after the Italian manufacturer, will be replaced in favour of new digital ones. The split-flap displays with their numbers and letters flipping over as trains leave and times and tracks change, were designed and manufactured by the Udine-based company specialised in public information boards. Solari patented the system in the 1960s and in just a few years the board was used in railway stations and airports across the world, becoming an iconic symbol of travel also due to its unique and irreplaceable sound of flaps turning. Technology evolves fast, and Solari cannot stand still. The company pursues innovation while preserving its signature features: Solari digital boards faithfully reproduce the sound and the actual turning of the flaps when data change. A Solari analogical board at New York's Penn Station has already been replaced in favour of a digital one. "Solari boards" are becoming a national issue debated across the U.S. and attracting the attention of printed and TV media - Wired, Smithsonian, The Washington Times, and CBS TV network. A national online petition in favour of the Philadeplphia split-flap boards has been posted on change.org. Citizens are using Twitter and Facebook to oppose Amtrak, the National Railrodad Passenger Corporation, uniting under the hashtag #savethesign.